What If I Need To Postpone My Wedding Again?

You’ve already postponed your wedding once, but what if you have to do it again? Here are five steps you should follow to keep your eyes on the prize.

By Jane Chertoff

change the date
Photo by Zola

The First Look ✨

  • Postponing again is a bummer, but you do have options, including picking a new date, having a smaller or virtual ceremony now, or even eloping and having a party later.
  • In order to postpone again, you’ll need to update your immediate family, wedding party, and all guests of any changes—even if you don’t have a new date nailed down yet.
  • You’ll also need to let your venue, vendors, and suppliers know that you’ve decided to postpone again.

Planning A Wedding During A Pandemic: Every wedding planning journey has its twists and turns. To make sure your path is as smooth as possible and to help you keep an eye out for tiny potholes and giant roadblocks, always follow the advice of your local health guidelines and the recommendations set forth by the CDC. The state of the pandemic can change quickly, but by staying informed, you can make it to your destination—wedded bliss—without a hitch.

You’ve already postponed your wedding once, and many feelings were understandably felt. Now, as the pandemic continues on, you’re forced to reckon with potentially needing to put your dream day on hold ... again. Send out for all the delivery ice cream you need.

Remember, deep breaths. You’ll get through this and eventually have the wedding of your dreams. In the meantime, here’s what to do if you need to postpone again.

Step One: Make a Game Plan

If your first rescheduled wedding date is quickly approaching (or even if it’s months away, but it’s looking like you won’t be able to get married then anyway), it’s time to make a new game plan.

Your options are to postpone again with a new date, giving yourselves plenty of time (ideally half a year or another year) to ensure that it’s safe for your guests to attend your wedding. Or, you could also change your plans—potentially having a micro ceremony just for you and your spouse (or immediate family only), holding a virtual wedding, and/or throwing a celebration at a later time with the rest of your invited guests.

None of these are easy choices, so you and your fiancé should weigh any and all options carefully, while always taking the current public safety guidelines into consideration. You might want to also work with your initial venue when making your decision, as they can let you know what the fees are (if any) for changing your date again, plus they can share what new dates are available for the next year or two.

Step Two: Notify Your Guests of Any and All Updates

Once you’ve made a plan that both you and your partner are fine with, it’s time to let your guests know what’s going on. You may want to first call or email your wedding party and/or immediate family so that they hear the news from you right away.

As for the rest of your guests, sending another update with a Change the Date card is a polite way to inform everyone of additional changes—this can be done via email or the post. You could also take a humorous approach (at this point it might be called for) with a “Scratch That, New Plan” card, “New Date, Same Wedding” style, or another funny subject line. Or, just go with a traditional “Postponed” card that says you’ll let guests know the new date when you’re ready.

INLINE Zola (1) Photo Credit // Zola

Step Three: Inform Your Venue, Vendors, and Suppliers

This isn’t your first rodeo. You already put in the work to postpone your wedding the first time, so you probably are familiar with the routine. (Download this checklist to help keep yourself on track.)

You’ll need to reach out to your venue, vendors, and any suppliers who are involved with the wedding and let them know that you’re postponing again. This team of people is unique to you and is going to help you the most when it comes to basic logistics. Together, you can work out a plan for the new timeframe and discuss the financial implications.

If you’re using a wedding planner, they may be able to provide a list of everyone you need to talk to, and/or help with some of these calls and emails. They can also help you read through and navigate the vendor contracts you had in place. If you put in a clause last time in the event of an additional delay, you might not have to pay anything extra. If not, plan to put that in this time in the event of an additional delay.

Step Four: Review Your Contracts and Arrangements

Speaking of, your contracts and arrangements will all need to be updated again to accommodate your new date, so take time to review them thoroughly. Your wedding planner may be a huge help when reading your vendors’ contracts.

INLINE IntimateElopementWeddingatSanFranciscoCityHall StudioOpia (1) Photo Credit // Studio Opia

Step Five: Let It Be

Remember, there’s a lot going on in the world right now that’s out of your control. Don’t let anyone make you feel guilty for postponing again. Instead, repeat to yourself that you are doing your best to make sure that your family and friends are safe.

When you do have your wedding, it will be even more special because you can all be together without worry. In the meantime, practice self care and take time to schedule calls or socially distanced hang outs with your favorite support people who can lift you up during this challenging time.

Simplify Your Wedding Planning at Zola