Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
COVID-19 Update: We are asking that our guests all receive a negative Covid test within 72 hours of the first event you will be attending during our wedding weekend, regardless of vaccination status. Email results to gatlinfligwedding@gmail.com.
COVID-19 Update: We are asking that our guests all receive a negative Covid test within 72 hours of the first event you will be attending during our wedding weekend, regardless of vaccination status. Email results to gatlinfligwedding@gmail.com.
October 30, 2021
Athens, Georgia
#gettinfliggywithit

Kali & Jonathan

    Home
    Our Ceremony

Our Ceremony

We are excited to celebrate our wedding with all our loved ones and would like to share more details about our ceremony. Please find information below behind the meaning and symbolism of each aspect in a Jewish wedding. You don't have to memorize these! The Rabbi will be sure to explain everything in real time :)
Question

The Ketubah

Answer

Before the ceremony, the ketubah (marriage contract) is signed in the presence of witnesses. The test of our ketubah describes our commitment to each other and our promises for our future life and family. The signing of the ketubah will be witnessed by Laura Palmer, friend of Kali, and Scott Kaplan, friend of Jonathan.

Question

The Kippah and Tallit

Answer

The kippah is the Jewish head covering and the tallit is the prayer shawl. Both are worn as a sign of respect during ceremonies. The kippah that Jonathan will wear is handmade by his grandmother.

Question

The Chuppah

Answer

The chuppah (wedding canopy) is intended to create an intimate, sanctified space symbolizing the home that the bride and groom share together. The sides are left open to signify that all friends and family are welcome into their new life and home. The roof of our chuppah is Jonathan's grandfather's tallit.

Question

The Wine

Answer

During our ceremony, we share a glass of wine from a Kiddush cup (ceremonial cup). The Kiddush cup was a gift from the Bakers.

Question

Seven Blessings

Answer

Sheva Brachot (seven blessings) are recited in Hebrew and in English. The seven blessings represent not only the happiness of the couple but of the entire community.

Question

The Breaking of the Glass

Answer

At the conclusion of the ceremony, the groom will break a glass under his foot in memory of the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. The broken glass also reminds us of the delicate nature of marriage, which must always be nurtured. As the glass breaks, it is customary for the wedding guests to shout "mazal tov!" a wish of congratulations and good luck.

Question

The Yichud

Answer

The yichud (seclusion) takes place immediately after the ceremony. The bride and groom retreat to a private room to share their first few moments alone together as husband and wife.

Question

The Seudat Mitzvah

Answer

Guests at a Jewish wedding are commanded to share in the joy of the bride and groom. The seudat mitzvah is a celebratory feast, so please join us as we continue to celebrate our marriage into the evening!